Lee County dog with special needs finds home 805 miles away

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Photo by Morgan Bryce

By Morgan Bryce
Editor

Christmas came early this year for Pika, a nearly 4-year-old pitbull who spent the last six months at Opelika’s Animal Health Center before being adopted by Dillsburg, Pennsyvania resident Caroline Blose.
The victim of an abandonment case, Pika was dropped off at the clinic by Lee County Animal Control in May. According to Dr. Buddy Bruce, she arrived with limited use of her two back legs because of a lower back/pelvis injury, and now fully relies on a specialized wheelchair for mobility, which was sponsored by Susan Bolton of the nonprofit Joey’s Paw.
“She had some sort of injury, but we have no idea what actually happened … maybe hit by a car at some point and time, and was probably never treated. Pika was almost paralyzed in the legs when she arrived, but it got progressively worse over time,” Bruce said. “But when we got her the wheelchair, she took to it like a fish in water.”
During the last few months, Pika attended several adoption events, with no luck or new family to be found.
However, Bolton connected Blose and the clinic’s adoption coordinator Sidney Dodd in regards to Pika’s future.
Blose, who lives on a 3.5-acre farmette in southern central Pennsylvania, has been a lifelong lover of all animals. She has been able to adopt and possibly save the lives of several dogs with special needs by working two jobs, experiences that she chronicles on her Facebook page “Jordan’s Journey.”
“I didn’t want Pika to die. She deserved to have a full life,” Blose said. “Plus, looking at her face, such a sweetheart. I fell in love with her immediately.”
On Wednesday, Dodd and others made the more than 805-mile, 12-plus hour trek to Dillsburg for Pika to be with her new owner.
“What I hope to achieve is to give these dogs a very long, happy and fulfilling life that would not necessarily have had, if I hadn’t adopted them. My life is fulfilled and so is theirs,” Blose said. “They get to live for however long is possible with their disabilities. In other words, a normal, happy and healthy life.”
“We hate to see her leave and that we won’t get to see her every day. She’s a favorite among the technicians and staff here,” Bruce said. “But, in the end, they and I know that this is the best for Pika and we are very, very happy for her.”

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