Cinderella: kind and courageous

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I took my young daughters to see the newest version of “Cinderella” the other evening.
We were wild and edgy and went on a school night; I don’t even care what they say about it. We wanted to see it. It’s cheaper on Tuesday. And, who are “they” anyway?
The fact that Tuesdays are cheaper at the movie theater gives us an excuse to go then because otherwise I have to dip into the family’s savings to afford it; with concessions costing a fortune like they do, it takes a bundle! The economy popcorn bucket and small drinks are a much more reasonable $2 on Tuesday.
We were home by 6:30 p.m., so supper and homework were attended to in an orderly fashion; by that I mean we swung through Chick-fil-A and did spelling in the car. It’s how we roll.
The movie itself was quite beautiful. I wanted to see it because one of those “Downton Abbey” girls was the leading lady, and I was scouting out wedding flower ideas.
We knew the plot, of course; it’s Cinderella! It’s Disney! Parents are going to die and a mean old witchy excuse for a mother is going to terrorize a sweet young thing until a prince appears and everyone lives happily ever after.
This film didn’t sway from the original. All the above happened, but there was a bit of a slant  that thrilled me to my very core.
Before Ella’s beautiful mother died, she made her promise to always be courageous and kind. This scene put a lump in the throat because everyone knows what is coming when that evil step-mother arrives.
Ella keeps her promise. When an unexpected (not really) meeting occurs in the forest between Ella and a very handsome stranger (we know who he is, wink, wink) she has just tried to save an elk from being hunted down – which, in the eyes of a 9-year-old, is both courageous and kind. And, as the story goes, the prince falls for this lovely but dirty (she obviously only owns one dress) damsel and is schooled by her compassionate heart as she asks him, whoever he is, to leave the poor animal alone.
The rest of the story is the usual. Prince throws  a big dance, all the girls in the kingdom are invited, Ella is left out. Perfectly delightful, ditzy fairy godmother shows up and bipitty, bopitty, boos Cinderella into that blue dress every little girl who goes to Disney World from now until eternity will have to have! It is gorgeous. I’m slightly crushed that I can’t have one.
However, fairy godmother’s white number was pretty spectacular also. I might be able to wear that to a costume party, if invited to one.
Cinderella makes it to the ball in an incredible pumpkin carriage, prince falls head over heels, and so on and so forth. Wouldn’t want to ruin the ending for anyone, wink again.
All in all, my girls gave Cinderella two thumbs up. Seems no matter how many ways you see this timeless story portrayed, it’s still enchanting. Definitely worthy of any flack I will receive from my imaginary school night judge and jury. Tuesday might become the new Wednesday for this house of wild women.
Be courageous and kind.
Angie Brown is a humorist who loves being a wife, mother and grandmother. She lives in Opelika with her husband of 31 years and four of their seven children.

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